Acoustics

Bridget Cunningham | November 17, 2014

The reduction of aircraft engine noise has been a priority in the aviation industry for many years. Minimizing sound emissions, of course, requires an understanding of engine noise — a task that can become quite challenging due to the complex nature of aircraft systems and geometries. Using a model of an aero-engine duct, we provide a more in-depth look at the acoustical field in aircraft engines.

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Laura Bowen | July 16, 2014

The need for a contaminant-free space to manufacture medicine has led scientists to try many creative new approaches to improve the process. At Argonne National Lab, creating a device that floats and rotates chemical compounds in thin air was just the answer they were looking for. It meant two important changes: the amount of each chemical necessary could be implemented very precisely and the risk of outside impurities disrupting the results was minimized.

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Fanny Littmarck | June 26, 2014

Sound Navigation and Ranging (SoNaR, more commonly written in all lowercase as “sonar”) technology can be used for investigating and communicating underwater. To improve the sonar system, you need to optimize the design at a component level. A major component of sonar is the electro-acoustic transducer.

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Alexandra Foley | June 25, 2014

Wind turbine noise is a (hotly disputed) topic that we’ve mentioned on the blog before. While research into noise production by wind farms is still being debated among researchers, one way we’ve found to overcome these noisy turbine troubles is to place turbines offshore where they can’t be heard and, conveniently, high winds with more regularity make energy production more effective. However, a question that comes to mind is: What impact do offshore wind farms have on marine life?

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Mads Herring Jensen | February 28, 2014

Previously, we introduced the theory behind thermoacoustics. Here, I will go deeper into modeling acoustics with the Thermoacoustic interface in COMSOL Multiphysics and show you some tips and tricks on how to do this.

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Mads Herring Jensen | February 27, 2014

When sound propagates in structures and geometries with small dimensions, the sound waves become attenuated because of thermal and viscous losses. More specifically, the losses occur in the acoustic thermal and viscous boundary layers near the walls. This is a known phenomenon that needs to be included when studying and simulating systems affected by these losses in order to model these systems correctly and to match measurements.

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Mads Herring Jensen | January 2, 2014

I recently had the pleasure of preparing a small contribution to the 166th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (Fall 2013) together with Wade Conklin and Jordan Schultz from Knowles Electronics. Wade presented our paper entitled “Characterization of a microelectromechanical microphone using the finite element method”. The work consisted of implementing a virtual prototype of a Knowles MEMS microphone (the SPU0409LE5H microphone, see picture below) using COMSOL Multiphysics.

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Andrew Griesmer | September 19, 2013

When performing an analysis on small-scale audio equipment, such as hearing aids, cell phones, and microphones, the obvious physical phenomenon that’s analyzed is pressure acoustics. However, there are other physics interactions that significantly affect these small devices, including electromechanical interactions and viscothermal losses. Most notably, thermoacoustics (the detailed modeling of acoustics including thermal conduction and viscous losses) is an often overlooked effect that can alter the results of a model. These effects are important in all devices with small length […]

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Andrew Griesmer | September 13, 2013

Starting the design process by testing on a small scale is often the best way to tackle issues affecting large objects, like a ship. Detailed in COMSOL News 2013, researchers at INSEAN, The Italian Ship Model Basin, used small-scale testing and then simulation to analyze the effect of placing a sonar system within the bulbous bow at the hull of a ship. Using a small-scale model of a bulbous bow, the researchers at INSEAN performed fluid-structure interaction experiments, and subsequently […]

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Supratik Datta | August 26, 2013

If you have ever stood next to a transformer, you have probably heard a humming sound coming from it and wondered if there were bees close by. When you hear that sound the next time, you can rest assured that it’s not bees but the magnetostriction of the transformer core that is making that humming sound.

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Bethany Nine | August 14, 2013

Multiphysics applications are all around us. Consider, for example, a setting where science may be the last thing on our minds: a music concert. You might be enjoying the slight sinusoidal variations in atmospheric pressure we call sound waves, or music, but those pressure variations must come from somewhere. In fact, they are due to a multiphysics effect where sinusoidal structural vibrations in an object disturb the surrounding air, causing pressure variations in the air that then propagate outward and […]

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